Thursday, February 28, 2013

ST:TNG 5.16 Ethics ~ Star Trek: The Next Generation Re-Watch

Worf gets crushed in the cargo bay in 5.16 Ethics.

Images Source: TrekCore

Star Trek: The Next Generation Re-Watch continues with ...

Ethics
Season 5, Episode 16

Story:
  • When Worf gets crushed by a containers in the cargo bay that result in paralysis. A neurological specialist comes aboard to assist, however her treatment is experimental and has low chance of success rate, but offers an option other than what Worf initial reaction which is requesting assistance in ending his life.
    Character Focus:
    • Worf is clearly the focus here. For almost the entire episode he is affected by the paralysis, and very quickly asked for Riker's assistance with the Hegh'bat (ritual suicide). He's rather withdrawn during the episode, keeping Alexander at a distance and not being open to conventional medicien.
    • Most of Worf's friends are closely involved in this episode, in particular Riker as Worf approaches his for teh Hegh'bat, Troi spends a lot of time with Alexander and Worf even asks her to take care of Alexander if anything happens to him. Picard is also indirectly a focus, as he is the sole person who 100% supports Worf's decision to commit Hegh'bat.
    • There is also a big Doctor battle going on between Dr. Crusher and and the neurological specialist Dr. Russell, who believes the benefits of her experimental treatment is worth the risks over more conventional treatment.


    Images Source: TrekCore

    What I remembered about this episode:
    • I remember not liking this episode, primarily because it's strongly and quickly presented that Worf will either be paralyzed for life or die by the end of it, however neither happens. It felt like a total cop out, especially as there aren't any lasting effects beyond this episode.
    What I noticed now, that I didn't notice then:
    • There are so many moral dilemmas and questions going on in this episode, from the medical ethics of experimental treatments to assisted suicide and also more lightly the rights or the patient. I don't think I saw any of that on first view.
    • I was impressed that Riker found an out tot he Klingon ceremony citing that a family member is the one responsible, which would mean Alexander and Worf could not ask his own son to kill him
    What feels different now, than then:
    • I'm actually glad this one has come and gone, it's one of the few of the series that I don't really like although this time around I did see more into in.
    • This feels like a rare episode where it feels like they show someone making the 'wrong' choices (saying yes to experimental surgery from a ethically questionable doctor) and ended up with the 'right' result (Worf survives and regains his mobility).
    • It was really touching to see Worf ask Troi to take care of Alexander if he passes away.
    What remained the same:
    • Although I get that multiple ethical questions were at play in this episode, it still feels like a cop out that it's a reset/Brady Bunch ending where in the end there was no lasting impact to the characters that had major things happen.
    What I see differently:
    • I was actually really impressed with Picard's stance on Worf and the Hegh'bat, he without question respects Worfs
      s decision.
    • There is a great scene with Picard and Riker doing regular ships business and going though files and such during the time that Worf is in surgery, and you can just feel the weight in the room of their concern for him.
    Great Quotes:
    • "This is part of that Klingon stuff, isn't it? My mother always said Klingons had a lot of dumb ideas about honor." - Alexander
    • "You and I could learn to live with a disability like that, but not Worf. His life ended when those containers fell on him. Now, we don't have to agree with it, we don't have to understand it. But we do have to respect his beliefs." - Picard
    • " I am delighted that Worf is going to recover. You gambled, he won. Not all of your patients are so lucky. You scare me, Doctor. You risk your patients' lives and justify it in the name of research." - Dr. Crusher
    Left off at:
    The experimental spinal replication surgery is performed on Worf, and initially it appears that he dies but due to redundant Klingon anatomy he actually not only survives but also regains his mobility.


    Images Source: TrekCore

    Wednesday, February 27, 2013

    ST:TNG 5.15 Power Play ~ Star Trek: The Next Generation Re-Watch

    It's all about getting to the southern polar region as Troi, O'Brien and Data take over Ten Forward in 5.15 Power Play.

    Images Source: TrekCore

    Star Trek: The Next Generation Re-Watch continues with ...

    Power Play
    Season 5, Episode 15

    Story:
    • The Enterprise detects a distress call from a M-class moon that was near where 200 years ago The Essex disappeared and when Troi detects that life is there, and away team investigates. One crash-landing and a pattern-buffer transport rescue, and away team returns but Troi, Data and O'Brien are accompanied by a second consciousness and the trio take hostages in Ten Forward to take over the ship.
      Character Focus:
      • the trio of Troi, Data and O'Brien are a focus, but as they are taken over by other entities it's not really 'them' we are seeing. They entities retain memories of their hosts and access both their ship skills and are aware of their personal relationships and the demeanor of members of the crew.
      • Keiko is also a focus here as she is in Ten Forward when it's taken over with baby Molly with her, and O'Brien remembers her and keeps coming back to her and Molly.
      • Ro also steps up in this episode, and comes up with several ideas to take down the hostage takers.
      What I remembered about this episode:
      • I remember being like "What the heck is going on? Troi hit Picard! Data's all in Worf's face! Who are these people?" It felt very original and I had no idea what would happen next.
      What I noticed now, that I didn't notice then:
      • This is one of the few episodes in the series that puts forward the idea of life after death.
      • It was really cool to see Ro step up and come up with so many options to take the invaders down, she is actually the source for most of the attempts they make. And it takes multiple tries. This isn't a super-clean one where they just figure it out, they really have to work at it. And the stakes are very high.
      • A shuttlecraft crash landing! We don't get tons of those. And the ride had some nice old-school shaky goodness going on. And their had shuttle craft seatbelts, I never remember seeing that before. Actually, almost every time they show the interior of a shuttlecraft it looks different. I guess they have different kinds.
      • O'Brien is totally kick butt at all this overrides and lock outs, pretty amazing for a transporter chief!
      What feels different now, than then:
      What remained the same:
      • It's a very tense episode, and although I remembered a lot of it I didn't know what would happen next whether it was what action would work against in invaders or if they were the crew of The Essex as they claimed, or even what their end game plane was. It's a very intriguing episode.
      • The whole possessed-O'Brien talking to Keiko and Molly was driving me bananas! Too tense.
      What I see differently:
      • Even though I enjoy both this episode and 5.14 Conundrum, I think it's a little weird to go from an episode where everyone looses their memory to 3 people being taken over. Actually, in both episodes the SHIP is taken over by other being(s). That's kinda crazy.
      • This is a fun one to re-watch, and you can see the actors start to act differently the moment they are aboard an inhabiting other bodies. In particular, Brent Spiner as the possessed-Data is fabulous and subtle in the turbolift on the way back to the bridge. You can see the minuteness of the change in his character, which is also a testament to how uniform 'Data' is played. It's quite amazing.
      Great Quotes:
      • "Spiritual possessions of this sort have been reported throughout Klingon history. It is called jat'yIn - the taking of the living by the dead." - Worf
      • "Number One, so long as they're on board this ship, I'm a hostage no matter where I am. We all are." - Picard
      • " If I could have killed that thing inside me, I would have." - O'Brien
      Left off at:
      Picard leads on the intruders that they will comply with their demands to transport 'remains' from the planet to the ship, but when they get it's clear that the crew will not let them be transported to earth and the big reveal is the entities are from a penal colony on the moon. Picard, Worf and Keiko all express they are willing to sacrifice their life for the crew and their families, and a containment field is in place so they can't get into the ship and they are eventually beamed back down to the planet.


      Images Source: TrekCore

      Tuesday, February 26, 2013

      ST:TNG 5.14 Conundrum ~ Star Trek: The Next Generation Re-Watch

      No one on The Enterprise remembers who they are in 5.14 Conundrum.

      Images Source: TrekCore

      Star Trek: The Next Generation Re-Watch continues with ...

      Conundrum
      Season 5, Episode 14

      Story:
      • After being scanned by a small vessel, The Enterprise crew looses their memory in terms of their role on the ship or their personal relationships, but they still know how to run the ship. The ships records indicate the Federation is at war with The Lysians, and are on a mission to destroy the Lysian command centre while maintaining strict radio silence.
      What it's really about:
      • The audience gets to see the crew in a different way, see what roles they would assume given the circumstances when they find out they've lost their memory. I think my favourite is Data thinking he's a bartender because he was at that moment making a drink for Troi!
        Character Focus:
        • This is definitely and episode where we get to see each and every member of the regular crew, which is something I always love! We also see how they assume different roles, most notably Worf assuming command because he is a 'decorated' officer
        • There is a new face aboard, who is eventually called Keiran McDuff and is noted as the first officer, but they use the term executive officer. He eventually is revealed to be a Satarran, who are the ones actually at war with the Lysians.
        • There is also quite a fun love triangle in this episode, which I don't think they've ever done in TNG until this point. They play it up with having Riker and Ro pre-memory erasure being totally at odds with each other, but when the memory goes they get along *really* well. We also have Troi in this mix as she feels a familairty with Riker, describing it as an memory of an emotion.


        Images Source: TrekCore

        What I remembered about this episode:
        • I remember really liking this episode, because we get to see the characters act still true to their personality but in a slightly different way. I always like these ones, and we see them pretty often in 'genre' television of scifi/fantasy/paranormal/horror.
        What I noticed now, that I didn't notice then:
        • OMG the alien is CREEPY looking when they hit him with a phaser! I wonder if they changed how that looked or if I just never noticed it before. It kind of reminded me of the pre-head-explosion in 1.25 Conspiracy.
        • I noticed right away that McDuff wasn't part of the crew and was part of the problem. I don't remember if I picked up on that quickly or not on first watch, but I saw a lot of them out of sequence so might not have.
        What feels different now, than then:
        • Although I love the gag that Data thinks he's a bartender, it's a bit convenient that Guinan isn't in Ten Forward or apparently on the ship at the time. She is always one who notes in these odd situations that something is off, or she's unaffected by these kinds of encounter.
        • It's horrifying that Picard first on the small Lysian ship and destroys it, he tried not to but once they fired on The Enterprise it was game over.
        What remained the same:
        • Seeing Riker and Ro get along was WILD. And it worked. Now that's good acting, to have both the angry/awkward scenes and the flirty/romantic scenes work.
        • I loved that you can really see people are who they are, and you can't supress your personality or rather those that normally do but how it came out here. I felt that was the case with Ro and Worf, Ro was much more relaxed and Worf was much more commanding than normal. It lends to the idea that they have acclimatized to their environment on the ship and toned down their personalities, although both of them have had a pretty trying past which can strongly affect demeanor. In that sense, it feels like it's saying that your personality doesn't come from situational learning, but rather is more rooted in our psyches.
        What I see differently:
        • I actually was a bit off my game remembering this one, and kind of blurred it in my mind with one that's kind of similar but different and hasn't come up in the rewatch. It's amazing how often that happens
        • It was really cool to see people try and self-discover who they are, like Riker listing off the things he found in his quarters that speak to who he is.
        • Looking at the screen cap images of this episode when they show a lot of the crew manifest, and for Dr. Crusher they have Wesley listed under 'offspring'. That's hilarious! Not so, not children, but offspring.
        Great Quotes:
        • "For all we know, you and I could be married." / "For all we know, you and I could hate each other." - Ro / Riker
        • "Nothing feels right. This room, this ship... most of all this war we're fighting." - Troi
        • "I feel as though I've been handed a weapon, sent into a room, and told to shoot a stranger. Well, I need some moral context to justify that action. And I don't have it. I'm not content simply to obey orders. I need to know that what I'm doing is right." - Picard
        Left off at:
        When they finally get to the target of the Lysian command centre, it becomes clear that something is off af The Enterprise could overpower the Lysians with a singular weapon discharge. McDuff tries to fire the weapons himself and activate Worf in a mutiny, but in the end is fired on by Riker and Worf which reveals *he* is the enemy of the Lysians, not The Federation.


        Images Source: TrekCore

        Monday, February 25, 2013

        Monday Meme: 5 Things I Love About February


        This week on the Monday Meme I look to find 5 things I love about February. It wasn't easy, but I found them! And even a bonus one.

        Feel free to share what YOU love about February too :)

        Check out more vids over at my YouTube channel.

        ST:TNG 5.13 The Masterpiece Society ~ Star Trek: The Next Generation Re-Watch

        Things get messed up for a society of too perfect humans in 5.13 The Masterpiece Society.

        Images Source: TrekCore

        Star Trek: The Next Generation Re-Watch continues with ...

        The Masterpiece Society
        Season 5, Episode 13

        Story:
        • While The Enterprise is observing the movement of a stellar core fragment through space, they discover a colony of genetically engineered humans living in isolation on a planet that will be severely impacted by the passing of the fragment.
          Character Focus:
          • From the genetically engineered human colony living on Moab IV we have administrator Aaron Conor who becomes involved with Troi, and scientist Hannah who teams up with Geordi to solve the problem of being destroyed but then wants to leave the planet and explore the universe.
          • From the regular crew Troi is a focus as she is one of the few people that goes down to the planet and becomes involved with Aaron, and we also have Geordi whose VISOR technology discussion with Hannah leads to the solution to the problem of the stellar core fragment.
          What I remembered about this episode:
          • I remember this one in a very general sense, I definitely recognized Aaron Conor and remembered the stay vs go argument although we had that back in 3.02 The Ensigns of Command and I don't distinctly remember this one from that one too much.
          What I noticed now, that I didn't notice then:
          • It's a pretty clear message that genetically engineered societies aren't a good idea, although they can be 'perfect'. It was quite clear that Picard is against them, and I would go as far to say offended but the lack of choice it gives people in their lives.
          What feels different now, than then:
          • I feel like I should have understood the whole 'genetically intergrated society' bit, I could understand how the people were engineered but how there they interdependent on their environment. It's odd that something so 'perfect' could also be so 'fragile'.
          • I did find the idea of everyone knowing exactly what they would be perfect at doing, was compelling. I wonder if they all felt as confident as Aaron did in their work. But what work did they do? They they grow, as well as 'evolve'?
          • This is an interesting take on a 'how what you do effects people' exploration, without falling back to the principles of the prime directive because the colonists are human. Riker and Picard even discuss this particular point.
          • It's also an interesting perspective that they have a pretty strong mandate to follow the intention of their ancestors, and they seemed to want them to strive for success but how do you grow if there is no change? Is no one ever bored? Or creative?
          What remained the same:
          • I never, and still don't, understood Troi's very emotional reaction to being upset with becoming involved with Aaron, and the tumultuous reveal of such to Picard in the turbolift. I also didn't understand it as a choice in the show, we didn't see Riker upset after becoming involved in 1.14 Angel One or 2.18 Up the Long Ladder? I think not! Perhaps because this episode in sequence is right after 5.12 Violations that if feels even more weird. It never sat well with me, and even on the re-watch I couldn't pick up on anything to clarify or explain what weirdness.
          What I see differently:
          • After playing DAoC, now when I hear the term 'Masterpiece' I hear a ding sound and see a little kobold dancing.
          • It's interesting to see another example of an isolated group with the strong belief in there superiority, which is quashed by The Enterprise. We last saw this in 4.15 First Contact, in which The Prime Directive was in effect.
          • I loved Hannah's argument that the people who wanted to leave, shouldn't have to stay 6 months because that would just give the people there time to badger them not to go. When the decisions made, it's made. Why wait?
          Great Quotes:
          • "So - guess if I had been conceived on your world, I wouldn't even be here now, would I?" - Geordi
          • "All of us in this colony have been living in the dark ages. It's like we're victims of a 200-year-old joke." - Hannah
          • "They've given away their humanity with this... genetic manipulation. Many of the qualities that they breed out, the... the uncertainty, self-discovery, the unknown - these are many of the qualities that make life worth living. Well, at least to me." - Picard
          Left off at:
          • Geordi and Hannah's plan to avert colony destruction from the stellar core fragment, but many of the people want to request asylum which would severely effect the integrated genetically engineered environment. In the end, Picard agrees to let anyone who wants to leave, leave; as to do otherwise would infringe their human rights.
          Images Source: TrekCore

          Friday, February 22, 2013

          ST:TNG 5.12 Violations ~ Star Trek: The Next Generation Re-Watch

          Trouble occurs when telepathic historians are aboard The Enterprise in 5.12 Violations.

          Images Source: TrekCore

          Star Trek: The Next Generation Re-Watch continues with ...

          Violations
          Season 5, Episode 12

          Story:
          • The Enterprise is transporting three Ullians, a telepathic race of historians who have the ability to help people access memories that have escaped them.
            Character Focus:
            • The Ullians, the telepathic historians who are transporting on the ship: Inad, Tarmin, and Jev.
            • Troi is also a strong focus as she is psychically attacked and put into a coma along with both Riker also Dr. Crusher.


            Images Source: TrekCore

            What I remembered about this episode:
            • I remember remembered that Jev was the person causing the assaults.
            What I noticed now, that I didn't notice then:
            • They really slant it so you think Tarmin is the culprit, often through pretty seemingly harmless/flirty-like comments.
            What feels different now, than then:
            • The idea of collecting memories telepathically to create an anthropological record of a peoples is fascinating.
            • It's wild that even after Keiko's very positive experience, no one steps up wanting to have memories surface. In fact, the entire bridge crew one by one politely decline the offer.
            • It's odd that the psychics attacks we see them from the third person, seeing who is being affected and what happens to them. I know this is for the audiences benefit, but it felt weird. I guess we see those kinds of scenes more often, and a little differently now.
            What remained the same:
            • This episode is extremely disturbing, and the first one of the entire re-watch I considered not watching because of how disturbing it is.
            • I did love that when Troi figures out it's Jev fights back and really lets him have it. I do remember how shocking and surprizing that was at the time.
            What I see differently:
            • It was actually even more disturbing than I remembered, taking peoples memories and heightening the fear factor on them. And Jev continuing to attack Troi after saying things like "Why do you have to be so nice? ... So lovely?" CREEPY!
            • It's kind of odd that almost anytime they have a new telepathic race, Troi can't read them.
            • It is kind of confusing though, because some of the memories we know are real (Dr. Crusher seeing her dead husband Jack), but some seem less so (Riker bring at all forceful with Troi).
            • Picard's end speech about the 'seed of violence being in all of us' kind of freaked me out, because it feels like a possible justification. I think I must have missed something though, because that doesn't seem to be in line with his character.
            Great Quotes:
            • "I've been accused of putting people to sleep with one too many stories, Captain. But this is the first time it's ever been suggested that I might be the cause of someone's coma." - Tarmin
            • "It's not easy having an overbearing parent. Believe me, I know how you feel." - Troi
            • "Klingons do not allow themselves to be... probed." - Worf
            Left off at:
            When Data and Geordi realize the only Ullian that was present at all of the previous worlds travels that had similar comas was Jev, they find him in Troi's quarters and break up the telepathic and physical fight. Tarmin explains that this kind of violation hasn't occurred in over 300 years but they have records to work with help Jev.


            Images Source: TrekCore

            Thursday, February 21, 2013

            ST:TNG 5.11 Hero Worship ~ Star Trek: The Next Generation Re-Watch

            The sole survivor of a destroyed ship starts to emulate Data in 5.11 Hero Worship.

            Images Source: TrekCore

            Star Trek: The Next Generation Re-Watch continues with ...

            Hero Worship
            Season 5, Episode 11

            Story:
            • When The Enterprise investigates a ship that went out of communications when entering a black cluster, they discover the ship is nearly destroyed. The only survivor is a boy, Timothy, who in an attempt to bury the emotional turmoil of the experience pretends to be an android like Data, who saved him.
              Character Focus:
              • Timothy is the focus here, being the survivor of the disaster on the Vico and a lot hinges on the crew getting information from him over what happens, but often the information he shares isn't accurate. He starts to emulate Data, a process that is encouraged by Troi and supported by both Data and Beverly.
              • Data is very important here, and we get to see him through the eyes of Timothy, ticks and all. We also see how he reacts to being emotionally needed, which is pretty rare but did happen back in 4.25 In Theory with Jenna.
              • We also see Troi flexing her counselling muscles here, working with and observing Data as well as advising Picard. It's interesting to see in both this episode and 5.10 New Ground often the approach is very gentle and to let things unravel and take the time it needs.
              What I remembered about this episode:
              • I remember this ones as the 'kid pretends to be Data' one, as well as the kid making the sculpture of the Greek structure.
              What I noticed now, that I didn't notice then:
              • It's a little weird that this episode involving a kid that has trouble adjusting, lies, goes to the ship's school and works through forming a bond with one of the members of the crew comes directly after 5.10 New Ground where all of that happened with Worf and Alexander.
              What feels different now, than then:
              • It was interesting to see Data say that he can not feel hate, I wouldn't initially thought of that as an emotion. It's also strange because this certainly is a vibe we get from Lore, both before and after The Emotion Chip.
              • It's actually pretty cool to see Data share so many of the things with Timothy about why he would want to be a human, a subject that often comes up on the show but for some reason here it was more ...all encompassing.
              What remained the same:
              • I remembered the story of Timothy strongly and barely the scientific issue with black cluster that The Vico, and eventually The Enterprise goes through.
              What I see differently:
              • Oddly, I they call the model Timothy is working to create a sculpture...but, if it's a recreation of an existing place I would consider it a model and not a sculpture. I didn't know I would make such a differentiation.
              Great Quotes:
              • "We're stronger and smarter than humans. We can do more than they can." - Timothy
              • "The best thing we can do right now is let Timothy take us where he wants to go. We should support the process and even encourage it." - Troi
              • "The servo-mechanisms in my neck are designed to approximate human movements. I did not realize the effect was so distracting." - Data
              Left off at:
              When The Enterprise starts to experience the same symptoms as The Vico, Timothy begins to remember what happened to his ship and tells Data as it happens. Data is then able to determine an alternate, and rather radical, course of action that pulls The Enterprise away from danger. Timothy sheds the android persona and starts to express his feelings over the loss of his family.


              Images Source: TrekCore

              Tuesday, February 19, 2013

              ST:TNG 5.10 New Ground ~ Star Trek: The Next Generation Re-Watch

              It's time for a visit from the littliest Klingon on the series in 5.10 New Ground.

              Images Source: TrekCore

              Star Trek: The Next Generation Re-Watch continues with ...

              New Ground
              Season 5, Episode 10

              Story:
              • While The Enterprise is observing and participating in the propulsion test for transporting ships at warp speed with no warp drive, but that plays just as the backdrop for the family drama of Alexander coming to the ship looking to stay with Worf.
                Character Focus:
                • Worf and Alexander are the focus here, specifically in their father/son relationship which we haven't seen much as Alexander has only been on the show once before back on 4.07 Reunion when K'Ehleyr brought him aboard before she was killed. Most of the episode is dedicated to them being thrown back together, Alexander acting out and Worf not being able to connect to him.
                • Troi plays an important role here, talking to and counselling Worf about Alexander, his behaviour and how they both lost K'Ehleyr.
                • And for the second episode in a row Geordi serves as the tech-entrenched character with his excitement over the soliton wave experiment.
                What I remembered about this episode:
                • I remember it mostly for Alexander, he's one of my favourite characters in the series and manages to be cute but also strong. Gotta love that kid.
                What I noticed now, that I didn't notice then:
                • Where does Worf's mother go? She comes on the ship with Alexander, but we never see her leave. Was she there? Did she take off? I know the story is about Worf and Alexander, but it's still odd.
                • Alexander is *quite* the troublemaker, but it was interesting to see the teacher give him the opportunity to fess up without consequences over Worf's more direct and severe approach. The funny thing is, neither worked! And then Worf, just like Alexander, doesn't listen to the teacher.
                • Worf and Alexander are rather awkward with each other, and a bit formal. It makes total sense, and I love the awkwardness of it.
                • I always love on TNG when they have some old-school 'shaking on the bridge!!' scenes.


                Images Source: TrekCore

                What feels different now, than then:
                • The two stories of the soliton wave and Ward and Alexander's relationship have an interesting and common theme of that to get to somewhere that's new and different, it could be messy and explosive along the way.
                What remained the same:
                • I barely remember the tech-story behind this one, and again barely noted it in this one as it was all about the relationship.
                What I see differently:
                • The scene when Troi counsel Worf is really good. She listens, notes that she isn't judging and provide him with great insight and choices to ponder. They aren't often in a long scene together, so it was a treat not only to see it but also to see how they play really well off each other. You wouldn't expect Worf to open up to anyone, but he does here and it really worked.
                Great Quotes:
                • "Every nanosecond in this continuum is a moment in history, once it has elapsed." - Data
                • "This is going to be like being there to watch Chuck Yeager break the sound barrier, or Zefram Cochrane engage the first warp drive!" - Geordi
                • "I apologize for being late Captain. I was detained in school." - Worf
                Left off at:
                When the soliton wave experiment goes out of control the ship needs to interceded however somehow in all of that the ship takes damage exactly where Alexander is and Worf saves him. Worf them offers Alexander the choice via a challenge to staying together on the ship, and Alexander accepts.


                Images Source: TrekCore

                ST:TNG 5.09 A Matter of Time ~ Star Trek: The Next Generation Re-Watch

                The Enterprise hosts a visitor from the 26th century in 5.09 A Matter of Time.

                Images Source: TrekCore

                Star Trek: The Next Generation Re-Watch continues with ...

                A Matter of Time
                Season 5, Episode 9

                Story:
                • While The Enterprise is en route to help a planet to get out from under an ice age they encounter a space-time distortion and then Rasmussen appears, who claims to be a historian from the 26th century who says he is there to witness an event.
                  Character Focus:
                  • "Proffessor" Berlinghoff Rasmussen is the focus of this episode, as he visits the ship claiming to be from the 26th century to pay witness to a historic event, however it's revealed is an until-recently-dismal inventor from the 22nd century. I'm sure that many people recognize Rasmussen, played by Matt Frewer and who is very well know for his portrayal of Max Headroom and he also was fabulous on the Canadian crime drama 'Intelligence'.
                  • Geordi also plays an important role here as he is on the planet helping with the environmental issues and even stays on the planet when they make the second attempt to fix the planet with The Enterprise firing on it.
                  What I remembered about this episode:
                  • I remember being totally reeled in by this one, and thinking it was a cool idea and not suspecting at all that Rasmussen was lying!
                  What I noticed now, that I didn't notice then:
                  • This actually isn't the first time we have the premise of time travellers from the future, it also happened to Picard in 3.19 Captain's Holiday where it also went pretty badly. Perhaps being more covert is a better way to go for folks when coming from the future.
                  • I'm again noticing the power team of Data and Troi, even though they don't work together in this one it does feel like in these situations if anyone is going to be able to figure out the true it will be one of them. Ultimately in this episode it's Picard, but I'm still sticking by it as a theory!
                  • The effects of the ship firing on the planet and then absorbing the energy and blasting it into space was pretty impressive! I rarely notice the effects, but the ones here were really good.


                  Images Source: TrekCore

                  What feels different now, than then:
                  • I think the fact that Rasmussen hands out questionnaire and wants to see a lot of devices should have been a red flag. In fact, I'm shocked Data did not notice that he stole something from his quarters, especially after entering without a greeting or requesting permission.
                  • You do see the crew express caution, but they do their own checks on Rasmussen's story which does appear to mostly check out.
                  • With the planet on the story there is talk of a similar environmental occurrence on Earth in the 21st century, plus there is also talk about The Greenhouse Effect. It's amazing how many time things that were actually in effect, or looking like they would go into effect, at the time when the show aired. Oddly, it rarely feels like any kind of social or political commentary or maybe being in that time masks that feeling.
                  What remained the same:
                  • It is interesting to see each of the characters reaction to Rasmussen, will they be interested to know the future and if so about what? Will they suspect him, and if so why? Will his checks and balances impress, or annoy?
                  What I see differently:
                  • This one was not the most interesting to re-watch because eventually it's a reset with both the planet being saved and Rasmussen being detained in the present with no effect on The Enterprise. There are some great scenes, and I do love the powerful sentiment that Picard eventually nails home about the power of choice, that made it worth it, but getting there was a long ride.
                  • I really loved the scene with Rasmussen and Troi, where she clearly indicates that she doesn't trust him.
                  Great Quotes:
                  • "By refusing to help me, you left me with the same choice I had to begin with, to try or not to try, to take a risk or to play it safe." - Picard
                  • "I hate questionnaires." - Worf
                  • "A person's life, their future, hinges on each of a thousand choices. Living is *making* choices!" - Picard
                  • "I assume your hand print will open this door, whether you are conscious or not." - Data
                  Left off at:
                  Picard eventually becomes suspicious of Rasmussen and they ask to see inside his ship after several items go missing from the ship. Data checks it out and it's revealed his is a thief and has come from the 22nd century and The Enterprise detains him and The Time Pod ship whisks off to another time without him.


                  Images Source: TrekCore